Subway Pome #65: For the First Time in Half a Year

For the first time in half a year
crowning buds
arc and curl
little flowers in the arch of Icarus
reaching up to the sky,
up from the very tips of the trees
below either side of the rocking car,
the sun pouring in softly through the windows,
the start of something lush
the militancy melts beneath the fiery tremors of spring:
all smiles –
even when they’re still standing in the doorway –

and for the first time in half a year
people on the train
are feeling their freckles get warm,
undoing their
winter bandages,
pushing their hair away from their skin,
letting it loose,
all smiles
because,
at least for a little while,
during the same ride
we take
over the same bridge
every day,
this morning
everyone on the Z Train wants to fuck.

The Cockroach Flu

In the opacity of the hour,
in the exhausting and dense mist of fever
I followed one of my dead cats
stepping behind its shadow
into the bathroom,

I flipped on the switch
tasting sweat and the deep pus of flu,
I had lost the ghost cat
and retched nothing and water,
painful bile and mucus pulled up from my curled toes
hacked
into my toilet’s pond cool water–

in the mirror
I hung my tongue out
staring into the metal
past the raw pink hot red at the back of my throat
where the tips of two antennae
long as swamp reeds
started stretching up,
feeling around
like safecrackers

maybe to steal my food again –

I am afraid I am turning now
into a bug,
rather:
there is a very large
bug
growing
inside of me
and the larger it gets
the less and less
there is of me,

the head and eyes
press up,
I heave
each time,
each of us
seeking
the best available option
among the roads to the sky,
its ardent wings tapping my ribs,
its tiny feet
stabbing my guts in a clamber,

at first it felt like
Blatella asahinai,
a cockroach,
but then the sick turned cricket brown,
grass green gathered in the corners of my mouth
and the kicking grew
hungry for the wind
convincing me
there is a
beautiful
six-legged
Orthoptera caelifera extremis
trying very hard
to get out of me.

Words: Where the Slopes Have No End

Richard Fulco is the editor and founder of riffraf.net, an incredible music site, and his debut novel, There Is No End To This Slope is out now. It is a compelling and absorbing read, a book which draws you into the story of John Lenza, a text book sales man trapped in his own history and perception of it. Richard was gracious enough to answer a few questions about his book.

GreenSpotBlue: Music permeates the story of There Is No End to This Slope, either the making of it, or procrastinating making it, or as a reference point for certain events in the characters' lives. How do you see the role of music in the novel? 

 

Richard Fulco: The novel’s protagonist John Lenza played one gig in a duo called Bong Lizard Gypsy in high school with his friend Joey Santone. They played three songs, “Rock and Roll All Nite,” “Twist and Shout” and “Jumpin’ Jack Flash.” 

Music is just one of the many things John has tried his hand at but eventually gives up. Nevertheless, music is the soundtrack in his teeming head. He’s a walker and music – whether it’s a rhythm, a melody or lyric - is always playing inside of John’s troubled brain.

 

GreenSpotBlue: Was there any music you listened to while writing? And if so, what? Does music play any role in your writing routine, as in do you listen to certain music before you write, or while editing?

 

Richard Fulco:  I do a great deal of writing in coffee shops and a person’s voice or a cell phone conversation intrudes with my creative flow, so I always have my headphones on.

I listen to all kinds of music too. My playlist ranges from Otis Redding to The Replacements and Chet Baker to Bach. Never any metal or hardcore and typically something melodic. Something that penetrates my brain but doesn’t interfere with the process. I enjoy the way a song, a lyric or a rhythm finds its way into the prose.

At one point, I was listening to Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground, and lyrics from “Perfect Day” popped into the prose. We couldn’t acquire the copyright for the song so it didn’t make the final cut which really disappointed me. 

 

GreenSpotBlue:  The novel takes place in several boroughs of New York City. Could you describe how place plays a part in the story and what importance it has to the lives of the characters?

 

Richard Fulco: John is a native New Yorker. And like all native New Yorkers, he has a love-hate relationship with his home. He recognizes that he might not belong in Brooklyn, but is too frightened to move (or make a move of any kind, for that matter).

The wonderful thing about New York is that it’s always evolving and one of its drawbacks is that it’s always evolving. For a relic such as John who is detached from his surroundings, his roots, himself and is skeptical of the rapid gentrification of the late 90s/early 2000s and is afraid to let go of the past, change is something he will not abide. 

John harbors a great deal of guilt, while he also idealizes the past. He romanticizes the notion that his childhood was a better time and that there was a better time in New York. John was raised in a New York that no longer exists.  

 

GreenSpotBlue: One thing I noticed on rereading There Is No End to This Slope was the interesting juxtaposition between John's Emma and Emma Bovary in the opening. It seems to set up what follows especially in terms of Stephanie's disgust at Emma Bovary. Was this a conscious reference? How important are character names to you in transmitting some aspect of their role in the story?

 

Richard Fulco:  When I begin working on something new, my male character is always “Stephen,” which I have stolen from James Joyce. Recently “Stephen” has given way to “Tim” or “Timmy.” There’s an implied innocence about the name “Timmy,” and I suspect “James” as well, that appeals to me. I’m interested in the manner in which a relatively naïve character navigates a hostile world. 

When I started writing There Is No End to This Slope in 2005, the name “John Lenza” had been percolating. I wanted to write about an Italian-American, which is an underrepresented ethnicity in popular American literature, and the name Lenza was somewhat attractive to me, most likely because of the implication of the word “lens.” It’s through John’s “lens,” his distinct point of view, that we observe his surroundings, relationships, struggles, hardships, pain and suffering. 

After years of rewriting, I discovered that John has some significant trouble with his Italian-American upbringing, so I gave him the name Gianni, not “Johnny.” John never wants to be called “Gianni.” It’s always “John.”

 

GreenSpotBlue: What books and/or writers have influenced you the most? Are there any writers or artists or music that you go to inspire or refresh you?

 

Richard Fulco:  A partial list of works and artists that have influenced the writing of There Is No End to This Slope includes: Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast, Michael Thomas’ Man Gone Down, Frederick Exley’s A Fan’s Notes, Charles Bukowski’s Post Office, J.M. Coetzee’s Waiting For the Barbarians, Walker Percy’s The Moviegoer, Samuel Bekett’s Waiting for Godot and Endgame, Harold Pinter’s Birthday Party, Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis and The Castle, Richard Yates’ Revolutionary Road, Joshua Ferris’ Until We Came to the End, William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, the poetry of Robert Desnos, the songs of Lennon and McCartney, George Harrison, Jeff Tweedy, Bob Dylan, Paul Westerberg, Jagger and Richards, Otis Redding, Stevie Wonder and Lou Reed.

 

GreenSpotBlue:  If there were one thing you wanted people to know about There Is No End To This Slope, what would it be? 

 

Richard Fulco:  I wouldn’t have finished the novel if it hadn’t been for my wife. Colleen supported me, at times financially, and not only cheered me on but proofread the entire novel and listened to me rattle on about it for the past six years. John Lenza could use somebody like Colleen in his life.

 

There Is No End To This Slope by Richard Fulco is out now.

Dad

Keep pushing me, keep pushing me
Keep pushing my love
” - Madonna

You wanted to
roll over,

we met when I walked into the gallery you worked in,
Adam had a show there,
the one with the mice,
I walked in saying
afraid, of course
that mine was small,
that men with high hairlines are usually smarter,
or
that maybe they even have
bigger brains

and on your left shoulder
tattooed
in green flourish

to the left of
the superior transverse ligament
and just below
the coracoid process

the word
“DAD”
grabbed me,

a slowdown,
to cool down,
to cool down,
back away.

things we're looking at: knobs

Faceted Geo Knob

Faceted Geo Knob

I am spending an excessively long time thinking about something so very small, that I really only need 2 of, but I'm an obsessive freak, so here we go. I literally spent 2 seconds deciding on the 45 or so pulls I will need for the kitchen (though now I'm beginning to wonder if that was not the best of ideas...) and I am spending weeks fretting over which 2 knobs to commit myself to for the new sink in the bathroom. it's a knob, not a tattoo, so it's not like I can't change it later, but the issue here is that there are way too many that I like. And since I cannot manage to sit still and solidly focus on 2 knobs for the minute it should take me to pick something, I'm dragging it out for ever and ever. So, this is my attempt to focus on the knob at hand (because really, I need to pick a refrigerator, so why not just put that off by more time wasted on a tiny knob?).

Because I'm focusing on fast, easy and available within 10 minutes of my house, the sink will be coming from IKEA. It's pure convenience on my part and a lack of ability to make myself order anything. Too much indecision and hesitation to hit submit on any order. Too hard to go to an actual store and look at what it available, what can be ordered in time. So much easier look online & see if what I want is in stock and then to ask someone to go pick something up at IKEA for me... We will be getting the HEMNES sink cabinet because it has drawers, unlike the pedestal sink I had planned on ordering months ago, and we really need more storage in that tiny space. I like the GODMORGON cabinet better, but I'm worried the high gloss will not hold up well in a tiny powder room frequented by hooligans. I also like that the legs on the HEMNES cabinet will hide a bit more of the tile until it can be dealt with properly. Actual sink & faucet to be determined in the next few days, as we are not all in agreement and I like to at least act like I take the opinions of other into account. My plan is to probably paint the cabinet & absolutely upgrade the knobs, which is where my ridiculous tortured inability to decide on said knobs, for an IKEA cabinet  no less, comes in. The thing is, I just remembered that I have 2 super, huge, shiny, nickel knobs that I bought at Moon River Chattel and that I adore that I need a new home for, but that would mean, no new knobs, so I better just forget that now.

At first I was thinking of big, round marble knobs to go with the marble window sill, but then I started looking at my options and, well, I found too many options. I suppose I have to finalize the paint color first, but some color or some shine, might be what I want in the end. 

Facet-02

Facet-02

Facet-03

Facet-03

Transparency-03, nest studio

Transparency-03, nest studio

Nest Studio. These are all gorgeous. They make me want to begin rethinking those kitchen pulls. 

Medium Clear Flare Cut Glass Knob

Medium Clear Flare Cut Glass Knob

Antique Sea Green & Turquoise Stone Resin Knob

Antique Sea Green & Turquoise Stone Resin Knob

Antique White Wood Melon Knob

Antique White Wood Melon Knob

Hobby Lobby. These are just a few of the very large selection of low priced knobs that can be found at Hobby Lobby. I like that many of them could easily be painted for the exact color pop that I choose. 

Simmered Glass Knob

Simmered Glass Knob

Streamline Knob

Streamline Knob

Lulu knob

Lulu knob

Anthropologie. There are so many knobs that I love at Anthropologie, I'm just glad that pulls aren't in the running as well. 

The Being Blues

More pointless art:

my jeans stink,
I’ve been wearing them
too long unclean,
my flag is free,
my bank statement says a little more than a hundred bucks,
I’m going to be selfish with it,
exuding arrogance,
“this is me,
this is MINE,”
the pen says,
the bank statement says,
I wake with tears of fear on my pillow,
tears of pathetic arrogance
believing in me,
special, precious
me,

they want me to write
beautiful things,
beautiful poetry,
blue-gray skies
filled with
big, white birds
over our heads,

they’re probably not even there
half the time –
the birds,
the skies,
them –

monkeys with car keys
we are insipid enough
to believe
what we see
matters
like we’re doing anything more important
than pushing the snooze button –

I don’t think it’s sad to say we don’t belong here,
we are miracles
lost
dreaming we are stardust special,
telling stories
about us
about us,

our people, our neighbors
we say we love
are suffering,
tortured,
dying,
being killed
all by design
in awful, shut-your-eyes terrible fucking ways
every day

but it’s not me,
the viper didn’t bite me,
I’m UNIQUE,
I won’t get bit
‘cause I don’t live
there,
I don’t do that,
me,
I don’t look
like that

pushing the snooze button,
pushing the snooze button
and laying there
listening for the alarm to go off again,
laying there in the softest bed on the planet,
loving my life,
counting the poems I’ve written,
noting every useless, goddamn thing I’ve ever done
that hasn’t helped a single soul on the planet,
hating everyone’s birthday
and the New York Times,

a fool for love
my friends all
piss me off,
the multi-colored beast,
we’re doing it, baby,
effete cocks starring in a filthy anal porn film
we wouldn’t want anyone to see
googling how long
before this nasty movie is over
with me singing during the credits
in my terrible singing voice
“everybody, I lo-o-o-o-o-ove you,
everybody, I do-o-o-o-o-o-o-o!”,
Crosby, Stills, Flaherty and Young,

I turned off
the alarm,
dropped my kid off at school,
told the boss I wouldn’t be in today
so I can sit down,
nervous about everything,
wiping my sweaty palms
along the slick shine
on the thighs of my blue jeans,
drink a beer at ten in the morning
and allow
the guy inside my round eyes
to dart out the window
into the pretend skies.

pinning away

At the moment actually getting anything decent done to post has been hard. Lots of snow days, lots of colds and we are rapidly approaching the first step in our kitchen redo which will be completed (in theory) at the same time we do some major work on the basement, do a mini-redo on one of the bathrooms, paint a huge chunk of the house and possibly/probably add insulation second floor before we freeze to death. It's all I can think about really, so focusing on making sentences is too hard for my tired little brain that is being tortured by refrigerator options and paint colors every moment of the day right now. However, I'm trying to visit Pinterest a bit more often and pin things to the 2 main boards, not just my secret planning board of reminders and whatnot. Here's a bit of what I've been liking lately.

want: lucite coffee table

cb2 peekaboo clear coffee table

cb2 peekaboo clear coffee table

Our new house has a very odd living room space. So far I've not figured out a good way to make it work. The overall space is long, leaning towards narrow and quirky. The opposite ends works perfectly for the dining room, but the main portion, though larger is very awkward, hampered by several oddly placed features. First of all, and my least favorite is that the front door opens right up into that same space, which, to me, cuts off a good chunk for the entry way (that is, until we can find a way to change this, hopefully). The remaining portion has one side cut awkwardly by the stairs, the other side saddled with a very large radiator under the big window and the far end filled with the door to the sunroom/office and a large fireplace. The remaining space is odd no matter how you look at it. Right now, since we aren't really using the space yet, there's not much in it other than a love seat, a ottoman and a desk. The area we've divided off for now as the entry contains a bit more furniture actually since we really do use that space for quite a bit.

In my head, I'm still working out the puzzle of how to shift all of the furniture & rugs to create a useful space (or least on that looks like we could use it), more of a sitting area than a full scale living room, since we have both a good sized family room and a nice office space right now just beyond. And in my head, as those tiny little wheels keep spinning around over the 4.5 million little things I need to do to this house I've gotten stuck on the idea of a lucite coffee table to anchor my odd space solution. It's something that I used to not really see the point of, until I moved into this house and now it just seems brilliantly suited to the space. Light, airy, there, but not there. Remaining functional, while seeming to free up the space. And it will be even better when I finally find the right rug for the  space to just float underneath. There are a wide variety options of clear, lucite, acrylic, glass and the like in a wide variety of price ranges, with some of the most impressive being vintage finds. I'm thinking something more basic and streamlined, like the cb2 peekaboo table (above & below), will be what works for us.  Here are a few shots I've pulled together for inspiration of lucite & other clear coffee & cocktail tables.

our living room before we moved in

our living room before we moved in

IMG_1699.JPG
IMG_1699.JPG
peekaboo clear coffee table cb2

peekaboo clear coffee table cb2

via lonny

via lonny

Craig VanDenBrulle's Clair Coffee table via 1st dibs

Craig VanDenBrulle's Clair Coffee table via 1st dibs

jacques cocktail table from jonathan adler

jacques cocktail table from jonathan adler

5 great: baskets

When everyone was little I gravitated towards soft storage containers because I was freakishly afraid of accidents. I am still freakishly afraid of accidents, but I think everyone is getting to the point where they are coordinated enough that such accidents are becoming less likely. The soft containers tend to not hold up as well and get pretty dingy and mucked up way too quickly. Baskets are more durable, don't show chocolate finger prints (of which we are way too prone to) and can go anywhere and not look out of place. So, I'm moving on up to mixing baskets in more and more. We have some very lovely vintage baskets, which I love, but here are a few new baskets that I also think are really lovely.   

MAFFENS basket, IKEA

MAFFENS basket, IKEA

I have this first basket from IKEA  and it's fabulous. Way less expensive than our vintage apple picking and french laundry baskets, but it still makes me happy. I'm using it as  hamper right now, but being on the softer side, it's a great basket for toys too. 


Round Belly Baskets, Set Of 2, Serena & Lily

Round Belly Baskets, Set Of 2, Serena & Lily

I could write a whole post on Serena & Lily baskets, but I'm going to pick just one (which is hard). This set of 2 has a lovely shape, great size and can also be sued for oh so many things in any room of the house. (These are very backordered, so I can use that to work in a few more- also check out the Mercado set of 2 with it's great colors, the lovely Seagrass with it's wood handles and the lovely Lagunas in a set of 3, just to pick a few more)

Large Curved Basket, west elm

Large Curved Basket, west elm

West Elm also has a slew of lovely baskets and this is my favorite. The shape and pattern are very pleasing to me and I'd love to look at it daily.  


rugby bin, The Container Store

rugby bin, The Container Store

Technically, this is a "bin" rather than a traditional basket, but it's woven paper, so I'm throwing it in because I really love it.  Think of it as a basket alternative with great style and a great price. 

Lattice Floor Bin, land of nod

Lattice Floor Bin, land of nod

This is a new one from land of nod and I love it. Yes, it is designed for toys, but it would look great anywhere. I love the yellow. land of nod is always great for finding items designed for toys that you'd jut love to use anywhere.

finding my inner garden

plants1.jpg

I can't do much about the garden outside right now, but I can start working on rebuilding our inside garden life. When we moved, we lost most of our plants for some reason. The only ones still hanging on are our fiddle leaf fig and one of my baby lemon trees. Be it changes in temperature or sun, the rest just did not like the new house and that was that. Even my very happy lavender that I started from a cutting is pretty much gone. So, I'm looking around for new plants to green up the new place. Before we moved, we focused on plants that would be easy to care for, easy to replace quickly if needed and would just look good while the house was for sale. Now however, we can just go ahead and start building up a garden's worth of house plants just because we like them. We usually have lots of lavender, thyme, basil (think edible in case our little "scientists" decide to experiment in their mouths- nothing is real here until it's been licked at least once), which grown well inside and look lovely plus our fiddle leaf fig that soldiers on no matter what we do it it. I'd like to add some maiden hair ferns & scented geraniums this year and, againk as with the yard, I'm looking for new plants that we haven't tried before.

While I was looking around at both indoor & outdoor plants (because all that white outside is really making me miss green), I saw avery helpful post on Decor8, 22 Hard to Kill Houseplants, which includes quite a few of my favorites and several I'd not see before. If you're looking for easy care houseplants, it's a great resource. Another interesting site is florandia which helps you pick just the right houseplant for you and is full of lovely images. I've pulled a few ideas from these and added them to my list of plants i'd love to add to the house. Starting plants from seeds or making cuttings is fun when you're patient and can wait for everything to take hold, but I'd really like some immediate gratification in some ready to take home full on plants to help perk up the house while we are working on fixing it up. The kitchen has a very nice, very sunny, very long marble window ledge that I'd love to fill with plants and we've just added many good spots for plants in the office/sunroom, but we still need find some plants that work well in the less sunny spots like the living room & dining room. By the way, if you go looking for images of lovely house plants, Scandinavian websites are your best bet. Here are a few of the very lovely plants I've pulled together so far:

 

myrsine via mitt vita hus

myrsine via mitt vita hus

myrsine (african boxwood) in some parts of the country this is a perfect outdoor option, tolerating low light & poor soil conditions well, but up here, it's a nice option for a pot. And it looks really cute. Little bushes and trees for the house.

mother and child via floradania

mother and child via floradania

mother & child (Tolmiea menziesii) is an interesting house plants that also can live happily outdoors. It features pretty green leaves hovering above citron colored balls and grows well in low light situations.

Kalanchoe blossfeldiana via floradania

Kalanchoe blossfeldiana via floradania

kalanchoe blossfeldiana: this one is a nice little plant that flowers in a variety of colors and does best with indirect sunlight. Once the weather warms up, it can go outside and hang out on the patio or deck. And it looks super cool too.

ginkgo biloba (upper left) via floradania

ginkgo biloba (upper left) via floradania

ginkgo biloba: another lovely indoor/outdoor option with a lovely leaf. This one also does well in indirect sunlight.

staghorn fern via apartment therapy

staghorn fern via apartment therapy

staghorn fern: I first saw these in a shot of Julianne Moore's city garden in Architectural Digest, and I have wanted some ever since. these amazing ferns really do hang from the wall, which is oh so fun. And I love those leaves or are they fronds I suppose? (see the Apartment Therapy tutorial on how to hang your staghorn here)

 

garden notes: planning

snow1.jpg

Though I can't even see the yard through all of the snow at the moment, it's time to start thinking about getting ready for spring. When I first looked at this house, I really didn't look at most of the actual house, I was here to see the furniture, but I did look at the yard. Even in the rain, I knew it was a superb yard. When the house we wanted to buy fell through, I immediately thought of this yard and decided that this should be the house we went for next. I remembered nothing about the house, but the yard was good enough that I figured, we could make the house work. The yard has a huge open area for playing, already has a slew of lovely old plants in the back, the remains of an area that will make a great vegetable garden, a handy garden shed and absolutely no fence.

The first shot i took of the back yard about 10 minutes after I first walked into the house on the day we moved in. I saw what appeared to be a rather huge dead tree looming over the backyard through the playroom window. Taking down the tree was the very first thing we did in the yard.

The first shot i took of the back yard about 10 minutes after I first walked into the house on the day we moved in. I saw what appeared to be a rather huge dead tree looming over the backyard through the playroom window. Taking down the tree was the very first thing we did in the yard.

We planned to put in a fence right away, but after living without it while we were dealing with having the giant dead tree removed from the back of the yard, it's beginning to feel a bit rude to go ahead with it. Areas of the yard are wide open to the neighbors and dropping in a fence where no fence has ever been just doesn't feel right at the moment. But, since we have our own actual, live children and we'd like to keep them in the yard and alive, we're going to need to do something. For now we are considering adding some large plant life and strategically placed trellises to create a psychological barrier in much of the yard and then just formally block off the areas that are wide open to the streets to our front and side. So far, the one who is the biggest escape risk, will not walk into anything that's growing higher than the grass for fear of messing up her pretty pink shoes, so it might be a good enough solution that I can at least catch her before she gets too far. The back yard already looks great, we just need to fill out some areas and bring back that vegetable garden. I'm thinking some nice heirloom vegetables will be fun. The front is a totally different story. Not much up there is worth keeping, so it needs a total overhaul. And thus, begins the planning- finding plants that are suited to the yard and the children. No thorns, nothing poisonous, edible would be good to be extra safe, evergreen would be helpful for those open spots. We ahve a range of full sun to full shade and need plants well suited to zone 6, so cold hardy is always a plus. We always stick with roses, peonies, irises, buddleias, hydrangeas and lavender with honeysuckle and akebia for vines, but we'd like to pull in a few new plants this time too. I've just started looking to see what I can find. 

Fragrant Mountain™ Sweetbox

Fragrant Mountain™ Sweetbox

Black Tower Elder

Black Tower Elder

Goji Berry Lycium barbarum Shrub

Goji Berry Lycium barbarum Shrub

Margarita Carolina Jessamine

Margarita Carolina Jessamine

Asimina triloba Paw-Paw Tree

Asimina triloba Paw-Paw Tree

Berry Blue™ Honeyberry

Berry Blue™ Honeyberry

5 great: duvet covers

It's cold and even when it's sunny, winter can be less than cheery. A great way to perk things up is swapping out a duvet cover for something new. If I weren't way too afraid to have something with so much white space on my beds (think little chocolate covered children and the like who think drawing with chalk and crayons on sofas, beds and tables is a good thing and will not be dissuaded), I'd be swapping out ours to one of these right now. 

Playa Stripe Duvet, west elm

Playa Stripe Duvet, west elm

I love west elm's duvet covers and I have one on my bed right now, but it's not quite as pretty as this one. I love the Playa stripes and the celery root is so pretty. This might just be the perfect duvet for me. The Steve Alan Stripe in midnight or the Stripe Duvet cover in Citron would also make me very happy.

Yellow Twin Duvets from H&M

Yellow Twin Duvets from H&M

H&M has 2 super cute twin yellow duvet cover sets, both for just $24.95. I'm always a sucker for stripes, but I love the geometric pattern too. These would be perfect for a stylish child's bed or in a guest room. 

Shapes Pastel Duvet, unison

Shapes Pastel Duvet, unison

Unison is another great place for striped duvets, but I love this geometric print. Great for a child's room, but I would love it on my own bad as well. So much fun.

Paradise Garden Hemstitched, garnet hill

Paradise Garden Hemstitched, garnet hill

I'm not usually a fan of florals, but this one has a nice sparse Japanese feel that appeals to me. I always love a good navy and white mix, but those pops of color add a bit of fun too. Subtle, serene and cheery all at once.

Lidi Fringe Duvet

Lidi Fringe Duvet

This really is lovely. Simple and playful, stylish and whimsical. I adore those colored tassels. It would just make me smile every time I walked in the room. 

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