Books: Fiction Round-Up

Sometimes life moves too quickly and you miss things. Especially with books. Here are four novels which you might have missed but should go back and read now. 

tigerman nick harkaway

tigerman nick harkaway

Tigerman  by Nick Harkaway is a great read, epic in its exploration of big themes such as the environment, geopolitics, heroism, and our idea of what a family is and can be, but it is also a novel that builds out onto these big themes with heart and character and keeps you moving through its pages. Set on a fictional terminal island of Maneau, Tigerman will grip you entirely as the countdown to the end of the island progresses.

 

The Strange Library by Haruki Murakami

The Strange Library by Haruki Murakami

The Strange Library by Haruki Murakami fits its title well. A short book, it has classic elements of Murakami down to the appearance of the Sheep Man and a girl that is actually a starling. And while this is not the next great Murakami novel, and more of an incredible snack than a fully realized novel the design and illustrations by Chip Kidd turn this story into an object of art worth the price of admission. 

Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill

Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill

 

Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill is a sparse but evocative meditation on relationships and human interaction. In beautiful and original prose, Offill unfolds a story that captivates you, living within the moment of the novel but moving you further and transcending the pages to create a meditation on the paths our lives take in a way similar to Buddhist koans, but Offill's gift is in linking disparate elements to create something strikingly coherent and complex.

The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell starts with the 15 year old runaway Holly Sykes battling not only her new found emancipation, but the voices in her head, strange hallucinations and possible otherworldly spirits seeking human hosts, and from there the novel really takes off in new tangents. In a way it feels like a return of Mitchell to the world of his early work Black Swan Green after the grand scope of books like The Cloud Atlas and The Thousand Autumns of Jacob De Zoet, but it goes beyond that earlier work to exist in a realm of its own striking reality.

 

All four of these books are out now (and possibly out in paperback by now)